Canterbury to Chief: Chung’s Transfer Helps in Net

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Courtesy of Dylan Chung

Nonnewaug boys soccer goalie Dylan Chung punts the ball after making a save during a game earlier this season. It was Chung’s first season with the Chiefs after transferring from Canterbury.

Christian Swanson, Sports Reporter

WOODBURY — Woodbury’s Dylan Chung made a name for himself this fall, establishing his role as the goalie on the Nonnewaug boys soccer team.

He wasn’t always a Chief, though — his freshman year he played at Canterbury School in New Milford as the starting varsity goalie. But how different were Chung’s experiences at Nonnewaug compared to his Canterbury days? 

Chung got a All-Berkshire League honorable mention nod in just his first year playing at Nonnewaug, so his transition to a whole new league hasn’t seemed to bother him one bit.

“At Canterbury, the coaches and teammates were very welcoming,” said Chung, a sophomore. “I was with them for three hours or more, six times a week, so we got pretty close. At Nonnewaug I’ve known a lot of my teammates for years, so it’s been pretty easy to transfer back.”

Not all leagues in Connecticut are even in skill level. Canterbury’s league, the NEPSAC, holds many talented schools such as Taft, Cushing Academy, and Kent.

“In Canterbury, I played a lot of high-caliber players,” Chung said. “The difference in the Berkshire league is that a lot of the teams are very evenly matched, but our team is very talented.”

Zack Hellwinkle, a sophomore varsity player, explained his thoughts on Chung’s performances at Nonnewaug.

“ I think Dylan Chung’s performances this year were pretty amazing,” Hellwinkle said. “Without Dylan, a lot of our games would be much closer. In practice, you can tell that Dylan was the right goalie for the starting spot.”

The differences in the length of the practices and the irregular game schedule surprised Chung.

“Practice at Canterbury would last around three hours long, so shorter practices is a huge change for me,” Chung said. “In Canterbury, we would have scheduled games every Wednesday and Friday, so having games a different day every week is very different.” 

As the season abruptly ended with the cancellation of sports at Region 14, the Chiefs ended up with a record of 11-1 — tying with Litchfield for the BL championship.